At the human scale

International practices in science communication

Il Network PCST pubblica un nuovo libro, curato da Cheng Donhong, Jenni Mecalfe, Bernard Schiele (Science Press Beijng, 2006)in collaborazione con Michel Claessens, Toss Gascoigne, Shi Shunke.
Tra i saggi, anche un contributo di Valeria Arzenton, Massimiano Bucchi e Federico Neresini dedicato al Primo Forum Italiano Scienza e Società, organizzato da Observa nel 2005.

I soci sostenitori di Observa possono scaricare il saggio qui (inserendo l’apposita password).

The production of science knowledge is doubling every seven years. As it expands, science splinters into new and unimagined strands. No one can keep up.
How can any ordinary citizens play a meaningful part in discussions on their future, in the face of this explosion of knowledge? Is it any surprise the public daily grows more sceptical about the benefits of science? Public demands for evidence and reassurance grow more strident, but most of all the public wants time to adjust to a world threatening to career out of their control.
At the Human Scale is a response from the public face of science, the science communicators. It stresses local action at community level and focus on long term effects.
It’s snapshot of ideas that work, a combination of theory and practice. It contains good ideas and the methodologies that lie behind them.
The papers in this book were presented at a symposium in Beijing, and voted by the international delegates as the most challenging, the most relevant and the most useful.

Contents:

Forewords

By the President of the China Association for Science and Technology

By the European Union’s Commissioner for Science and Research

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Part 1—Considering science and society
Communicating science in the real context of society

Bernard SCHIELE

Public perception of science and technology: a European perspective

Michel CLAESSENS

Part 2—Overcoming youth apathy

Overcoming youth apathy

Jenni METCALFE, LI Xi

BA CREST awards: celebrating creativity in science and technology

Sharmila BANERJEE

Science classes at village offices

Jaung Shick KIM, Duckhwan LEE

When the place has a role

Jan RIISE

Questacon ScienceLines: Indigenous outreach

Allen ROONEY

‘Imagine’: sharing ideas in the life sciences

Daan SCHUURBIERS, Marije BLOMJOUS, Patricia OSSEWEIJER

Summaries of other youth case studies

Part 3—Community: the arena

Community: the arena

CHENG Donghong, SHI Shunke

Does science belong to everybody? The first Italian Science in Society Forum

Valeria ARZENTON, Massimiano BUCCHI, Federico NERESINI

Landcare in the Philippines: recognizing the importance of effective communication

Gerardo BOY

Science communication in participatory projects in Australia: two case studies in natural resource management

Anne LEITCH, Cathy PITKIN

A contextual approach to promoting debate and social engagement in science and technology
Victoria MENDIZÁBAL, Elena SANFELIU SABATER

Improving indigo-dyed textiles: a community-oriented communication success

Yuwanuch TINNALUCK

Summaries of other community case studies

Part 4—Scientists engaging with the public

Scientists engaging with the public

Toss GASCOIGNE

‘Perspectives’: scientists communicating the social context of their work

Nicholas HILLIER

Media skills workshops: breaking down the barriers between scientists and journalists

Jenni METCALFE, Toss GASCOIGNE

Science shops as university–community interfaces: an interactive approach in science
communication

Henk A. J. MULDER, Caspar F. M. DE BOK

The big hand that peels off the apple skin for the little ants: a case study of CAS ASPIRE

OUYANG Jing

A case study of citizen science

Tina PHILLIPS, Bruce LEWENSTEIN, Rick BONNEY

Summaries of other scientists’ case studies

Abbreviations and acronyms

The Public Communication of Science and Technology (PCST) Network